News-Archiv

News filtern
InIIS-LogoInIIS-Logo
Mitarbeiter*innen telefonisch nicht erreichbar

Die Universität ist in einen Notbetrieb versetzt worden. Auch das InIIS wird bis auf Weiteres geschlossen.

Die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter sind telefonisch nicht mehr zu erreichen. Sie können sich aber per Email an uns wenden. Bei der Bearbeitung müssen Sie allerdings mit Verzögerungen rechnen. Alle Mailadressen der InIIS-Mitglieder  finden Sie auf der Seite Personen.

Collage zum InIIS-Newsletter 11Collage zum InIIS-Newsletter 11
Ab sofort als PDF erhältlich

Der Newsletter ist hier erhältlich (PDF).

EISA-Logo (c) EISAEISA-Logo (c) EISA
EISA, 14th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, Malta, 16.-19. September 2020

Der CfP zum Download (PDF)

Call for Papers: ‘The Politics of Internationalised Welfare’ (S39)
European International Studies Association (EISA), 14th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, Msida, Malta, September 16 – 19, 2020
Proposal submission deadline: March 16, 2020
Section chairs: Alex Veit & Kressen Thyen (University of Bremen)
The call for papers is now open for “The Politics of Internationalised Welfare”, Section 39 at the EISA-PEC, 16-19 September 2020.

Section 39: The Politics of Internationalised Welfare

In recent years, students of International Relations have increasingly paid attention to internationalised welfare as a relevant field of study. In contrast to the traditional welfare literature, which conceptualises social policy primarily as a domestic issue, this new branch of scholarship emphasises the influence and impact of global dynamics and international actors on social needs and welfare provision. However, different areas of international engagement, such as global health, social protection, or humanitarian aid, are often treated as separate fields of study.In this section, we aim to bring these fields together and to analyse the fundamental questions linking them: How do international political structures—from colonialism to global governance—impact on welfare states around the globe? What influence do international and transnational actors have on the design, finance and provision of welfare systems? Which ideas and interests drive international involvement in welfare provision?
From the ‘age of empires’ to the contemporary multilateral world, international authorities and actors have addressed social inequality, political grievances and environmental risks in different ways. This section seeks to highlight changes and continuities of internationalised welfare. It is therefore structured in a historical order that connects the past, present, and future.
With this call we are inviting paper proposals in particular relating to the following panels:
- Imperial, Late Imperial and Post-Imperial Welfare Politics in the Global South
- Welfare in the Post-colony: Between Popular Contention, Statebuilding and Internationalisation
- Beyond Capital IR – Studying Social Questions in the Countryside
- Climate Change and Poverty: Vulnerable Populations, Human Security & Social Justice
A more detailed description of the intended panels follows below.
Please submit your paper proposal through the EISA-PEC online platform. Submission guidelines are available here: https://eisa-net.org/pec-2020-abstract-submission-guidelines/
We look forward to receiving your proposals and to seeing you in Msida!
Alex & Kressen
2
Imperial, Late Imperial and Post-Imperial Welfare Politics in the Global South
Panel Chair: Roy Karadağ
This panel targets the imperial sources of internationalised welfare. It aims to bring together scholars who investigate and critically reflect upon the ideas, policy measures and practices of empires in identifying, problematizing and dealing with poverty, social crises and contestations from excluded groups across global peripheries. What were the features of this imperial wave of global social policy? Under which conditions did imperial politicians, bureaucrats and academics engage with teaching, healing and nurturing subject populations in colonies and protectorates? In which ways were these policies and practices themselves transformed in the late imperial years after the Second World War? What were the overall consequences for social policy making after decolonisation had finally materialised?
Organised around this set of questions, contributions ideally bridge the gap between themes of dependent development and the politics of empire, on the one hand, and of welfare statism and social policy, on the other hand. In particular, the goal is to theorise what the ‘imperial’ is in ‘imperial social policy and welfare’. Geographically, we invite papers that cover African, Middle Eastern and Asian contexts of imperial rule. With regard to policy fields, papers may cover anything from education, health, food, labour, pensions, housing and social assistance schemes. Contributions may render the multi-sited and multi-causal nature of imperial policy making visible, for example by investigating the various imperial justifications of policies and regulations, and the contestations they produced both within and beyond the respective imperial institutions.
Welfare in the Post-colony: Between Popular Contention, Statebuilding and Internationalisation
Panel Chairs: Kressen Thyen & Alex Veit
This panel interrogates postcolonial welfare states in the Global South as processes and products of entanglement between domestic and transnational political configurations.
On the national level, public welfare connects state organizations and social groups. It may increase state legitimacy, but also trigger new demands. It addresses social inequality, but also manifests group privileges. It symbolises nationhood and provides vision, but also exposes gaps between ambition and implementation. Geographically, welfare bureaucracies embody the state in the most remote village, but also reproduce urban-rural divides. Welfare administrative knowledge is the backbone of planning for the public good, but such data can also be used as a tool of control and repression. In sum, welfare provision creates colourful, often contradictory bonds between states and populations.
At the same time, welfare states of the Global South are transnational configurations. The design, finance, and provision of welfare is a transnational process in which international organisations, bilateral donors, transnational NGOs, religious organisations and expert communities are centrally involved. While such international involvement arguably creates a “global social policy” in its infancy, it also renders concepts of sovereignty, citizenship, democracy, accountability, entitlement, and durability highly precarious. This fundamentally puts into question previous assumptions on welfare state formation.
To address these processes of entanglement between transnational and domestic configurations, we invite papers addressing or relating to the following questions: How can we conceptualise welfare in the Global South? How does internationalisation impact on everyday patterns of legitimation and
3
contestation? In what ways did neoliberalism and structural adjustments disrupt postcolonial welfare politics? Where do countervailing ideas emerge against dominant welfare approaches?
Beyond Capital IR – Studying Social Questions in the Countryside
Panel Chairs: Klaus Schlichte & Anna Wolkenhauer
A lot is going on in the countryside. In recent years, Sociology, Development Studies and Political Science have paid renewed attention to rural areas for a number of reasons. Deteriorating food security, increasingly frequently felt impacts of climate change, and a growing awareness of sustainability issues have put farmers back at the centre of attention.
Practices like land-grabbing, the depletion of natural resources, food insecurity or huge gaps in public service delivery seem to fuel forms of opposition that have hitherto rather been ignored by “capital IR”. This panel aims at interrogating social questions that specifically address rural areas, rural populations and internationalised politics targeting them. This can include social policies, rural development, food policies or other schemes geared by “the will to improve” (Tanya Li). While locally effective, state and non-state policies are embedded in a global system of development initiatives, governance structures, trade rules, and political representation more widely. We are convinced that IR is well-advised not to ignore the connections between rural change and international structures – historical and contemporary.
This panel invites contributions related to the following or related questions: How are structural transformations in the countryside addressed by (internationalised) welfare? How have state retrenchment and a neoliberal redefinition of social policy affected rural areas? How are social and political questions related in the countryside; do welfare and political representation interact? What potential do food security interventions hold for social inclusion and transformation?
Climate Change and Poverty: Vulnerable Populations, Human Security & Social Justice
Panel Chair: Simon Chin-Yee
Climate change plays an increasingly important role in discussions of poverty, human security and socio-economic risks. Vulnerable populations are increasingly susceptible to weather shocks, desertification, sea level rise and conflicts which can lead to poverty traps. Sustained eradication of poverty will depend on many socio-economic conditions, including access to health care, education and economic growth. Climate change impacts on poverty exponentially as vulnerable populations are more exposed to its effects and have less capacity to adapt or react to natural disasters. Additionally, climate change is increasingly seen as a threat multiplier further exacerbating impacts on human security. These are human rights and climate justice issues.
This panel seeks to examine how changing environmental conditions are impacting vulnerable populations with an eye to the future, answering questions such as: How can vulnerable communities avoid falling into the poverty trap? How do populations cope when experiencing negative shocks in multiple channels simultaneously? What responsibility does the global climate regime have to address issues of human rights and vulnerable populations? To what extent are climate related risks addressed by internationalised social policy-making?
4
Programme
https://eisa-net.org/pec-2020-sections/#topanchor
Contact
Section Chairs are Alex Veit (veit@uni-bremen.de) and Kressen Thyen (thyen@uni-bremen.de), Institute for Intercultural and International Studies (InIIS), CRC Global Dynamics of Social Policy, University of Bremen, Germany.
For further information related to the submission process please contact info.pec20@eisa-net.org.

Illustration für Call of Papers (Foto: Pixabay)Illustration für Call of Papers (Foto: Pixabay)
Africa Challenges Konferenz 27.-30.06.2020

Die Konferenz African Challenge ist eine Verstaltung der  African Studies Association in Germany (VAD e.V.). Das Hochladen der Papers zum Panel "P14: Protests in Africa and their outcomes" etfolgt über die Website der Konferenz.

Die Proteste in Afrika haben in den letzten zehn Jahren stark zugenommen. Die Welle der Protestbewegungen steht in engem Zusammenhang mit den limitierten Entwicklungsbemühungen der afrikanischen Regierungen. Die weit verbreiteten Proteste fordern die gegenwärtigen Regierungen in bezug auf Regierungsführung, Einkommens- und Vermögensverteilung und Bildungsthemen heraus. Klassenübergreifende Koalitionen zwischen der Mittel- und Unterschicht scheinen diese Demonstrationen voranzutreiben. 

Während es Studien zu den Ursachen für den jüngsten Protesthöhepunkt gibt wurden den Ergebnissen dieser Proteste bisher nur wenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Auch die innere Zusammensetzung der Protestbewegungen verdient weitere Aufmerksamkeit.

Dieses Panel fragt:

- Was sind die tatsächlichen Ergebnisse der aktuellen Proteste?

- Wie und wo drängen Protestkoalitionen auf Veränderungen? Übersetzen sich ihre Forderungen in konkrete Reformen, oder haben die Regierungen erfolgreich grundlegende Reformen abgewehrt

- Was sind die kontextuellen Bedingungen, die den Ausgang von Protesten beeinflussen?

- Welche Lehren können aus den Bewegungen des Südens für die Theorie der sozialen Bewegungen gezogen werden?

Wir begrüßen sowohl vergleichende Analysen als auch vertiefte Fallstudien. Außerdem laden wir zu Beiträgen en, die sich auf der Mikro- und Mesoebene die Prozesse der Koalitionsbildung untersuchen.

 

Die Proteste in Afrika haben in den letzten zehn Jahren stark zugenommen. Die Welle der Protestbewegungen steht in engem Zusammenhang mit den limitierten Entwicklungsbemühungen der afrikanischen Regierungen. Die weit verbreiteten Proteste fordern die gegenwärtigen Regierungen in bezug auf Regierungsführung, Einkommens- und Vermögensverteilung und Bildungsthemen heraus. Klassenübergreifende Koalitionen zwischen der Mittel- und Unterschicht scheinen diese Demonstrationen voranzutreiben.

Während es Studien zu den Ursachen für den jüngsten Protesthöhepunkt gibt wurden den Ergebnissen dieser Proteste bisher nur wenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Auch die innere Zusammensetzung der Protestbewegungen verdient weitere Aufmerksamkeit.

Dieses Panel fragt:

- Was sind die tatsächlichen Ergebnisse der aktuellen Proteste?

- Wie und wo drängen Protestkoalitionen auf Veränderungen? Übersetzen sich ihre Forderungen in konkrete Reformen, oder haben die Regierungen erfolgreich grundlegende Reformen abgewehrt

- Was sind die kontextuellen Bedingungen, die den Ausgang von Protesten beeinflussen?

- Welche Lehren können aus den Bewegungen des Südens für die Theorie der sozialen Bewegungen gezogen werden?

Wir begrüßen sowohl vergleichende Analysen als auch vertiefte Fallstudien. Außerdem laden wir zu Beiträgen en, die sich auf der Mikro- und Mesoebene die Prozesse der Koalitionsbildung untersuchen.

 

Plakat: Politische SprechstundePlakat: Politische Sprechstunde
Stellen Sie Ihre Fragen an Dr. Roy Karadag

(c) Harald Rehling / Universität BremenDie Sprechstunde wird von Roy Karadag, angeboten. Sie können als einzelne oder in kleinen Gruppen kommen. 
Die Sprechstunde richtet sich an alle interessierten Bürgerinnen und Bürger. Es wird kein Vorwissen vorausgesetzt.

Die Sprechstunde findet im InIIS an der Universität Bremen statt (Mary-Somerville-Str. 7)

Termine können Sie per Email oder Telefon vereinbaren:

karadag@uni-bremen.de
Tel. 218 - 67468

Auch wenn der Geschäftsführer bis voraussichtlich April 2020 in Elternzeit ist, findet die Politische Sprechstunde weiterhin statt.

Ein Portrait Roy Karadags finden Sie auf der Seite der Universität Bremens.

EISA LogoEISA Logo
EISA Workhop vom 1. bis 4. Juli 2020 in Brüssel

CfP als PDF: "Strangeness as an Asset - Self-Reflexivity in Global Social and Development Policy"

7th European Workshops in International Studies Brussels, 1-4 July 2020 

Submission of abstracts until 13/01/2020 through EISA 

John Berten, University of Tübingen, john.berten@ifp.uni-tuebingen.de

Anna Wolkenhauer, University of Bremen, wolkenhauer@bigsss.uni-bremen.de

Aiming at reducing poverty, a myriad of specialised experts in international organisations and beyond produce large amounts of evidence in countries of the Global South, formulating policy recommendations based on ever more sophisticated models and tools designed to maximise effectiveness and ensure efficient spending for desired outcomes. Scholars of social policy and development frequently use quantitative knowledge as a research tool, without reflecting on the conditions of its production. Being closely intertwined, the spheres of policy and the academe in global social policy and development (GSP&D) provide an insightful example of the constitutive role of knowledge production for policies – and ultimately societal relations.

Yet, practices of knowledge and evidence production in GSP&D are undertheorised. Policy diffusion theory, for instance, assumes an unproblematic transmission of policies across borders, not offering insights on how experiences are turned into policy ideas in the first place or how policy knowledge is transformed into objects ready to be transferred to other sites. More particularly, it does not reflect on the limits and power implications of particular disciplines’ ways of knowledge production, including conceptions of objective and neutral knowledge.

From studies inspired by STS we know that power and authority operate in (policy) knowledge production in various ways. As part of a 'politics by other means', (Latour 1988), the knowledge-policy relationship is characterized by assemblages between varied actors, technologies, materials and (performative) practices. Thereby, STS highlights that every knowing means transformation, because every representation of the 'world out there' is actually an intervention in the world, and not least the choice of one’s research methods has real effects.

Nowadays, IR reflexively debates its own colonial origins, racialised power relations and silencing of non-Western contributions. In a constructivist sense, reflexivity matters for critically examining knowledge-power relations within IR as a discipline itself, as well as for studying its research objects. Yet, to free reflexivity from its “meta-theoretical entrapment” (Hamati-Ataya 2013), theoretical elaborations need to be complemented by empirical studies of knowledge production in GSP&D, with the aim to imagine potentially more emancipatory research practices. Due to the intertwined roles of academics in the Global North and policy researchers operating in the Global South, the case of GSP&D is well suited for studying knowledge production from a self-reflexive stance – in IR and beyond.

The workshop welcomes participants interested in exploring the myriad knowledge-power relationships in social policy and/or development, including possibilities for putting reflexivity into (research) action. Ideally, participants should be willing to contribute to a joint publication. Potential questions include:

How can we reflexively theorise knowledge-production in GSP&D?

  • What theoretical approaches shed light on the intimate relationship between knowledge and power?
  • How do different types of knowledge communicate in GSP&D?
  • How can racial and postcolonial asymmetries be factored into the analysis?
  • What kind of world are GSP&D scholars creating, and how? Are there alternatives?

 

How can IR’s meta-theoretical reflexivity inform emancipatory empirical research?

  • What does self-reflexivity mean for our own (field) research?
  • What kind of reflexive findings could matter for a world beyond the discipline of IR?
Plakat Plakat "Wilde Theorie 23"
Wilde Theorie #23 mit Claudia Brunner

Vortrag und Diskussion: 14. Januar 2020, 18.00 (s.t.) – 19.30 Uhr

Workshop für Interessierte: 15.Januar 2020, 10.15 – 12.45 Uhr
Anmeldung unter: gundula.ludwig@uni-bremen.de

Raum 7.2210 (InIIS), Unicom Gebäude, Mary-Somerville-Straße (Haus Wien) 7

Das Plakat zum Herunterladen (PDF)

Gewalt ist nicht nur Ereignis, sondern auch Prozess und Verhältnis. Sie zerstört Ordnung nicht nur, sondern begründet sie und hält sie aufrecht. Der Dimension des Wissens wird dabei in konventioneller Forschung wenig Bedeutung beigemessen, gilt sie doch als Gegenteil von oder als Gegenmittel zu Gewalt. Mit dem Begriff der »epistemischen Gewalt« rückt Claudia Brunner den konstitutiven Zusammenhang von Wissen, Herrschaft und Gewalt in der kolonialen Moderne, unserer Gegenwart, in den Fokus. Ausgehend von feministischer, post- und dekolonialer Theorie konturiert sie in Auseinandersetzung mit den Konzepten struktureller, kultureller, symbolischer und normativer Gewalt ein transdisziplinäres Konzept epistemischer Gewalt.

Informationen zum Forschungsprojekt Epistemic Violence und zu Claudia Brunner finden Sie hier.

Wilde Theorie ist eine Veranstaltungsreihe im Rahmen des Bremer Kolloquiums für Politische Theorie unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Martin Nonhoff. Hier stellen Theoretiker_innen, die sich in der Phase zwischen Doktorarbeit und Professur befinden, aktuelle Arbeiten zur Diskussion. Gelegenheit dafür gibt jeweils ein öffentlicher Vortrag im Bremer Kolloquium für Politische Theorie und ein Workshop am folgenden Morgen. Zu den Workshops bitten wir um vorherige kurze Anmeldung; gerne spätestens eine Woche vorab.

 

 

InIIS-LogoInIIS-Logo
Workshop am 17.01.2020

Demokratie provinzialisieren. Postkoloniale Perspektiven auf Demokratietheorie 
Workshop am 17.01.2020
9.30-16.00

InIIS, Raum 7.2210
 

Obwohl in den letzten Jahren postkoloniale Ansätze auch in der Politikwissenschaft an Bedeutung gewonnen haben, sind bei der Diskussion dessen, was es heißt, heute über Demokratie nachzudenken, postkoloniale Perspektiven immer noch rar. Vor diesem Hintergrund wollen wir uns in dem Workshop systematisch mit der Frage auseinandersetzen, wie Demokratietheorien aus postkolonialer Perspektive gelesen, erweitert, kritisiert werden können und wie auf diese Weise das Verständnis von und die Kritik an Demokratie präzisiert werden kann. Wir wollen (radikale) Demokratietheorie in Dialog mit post- und dekolonialen Theorie bringen, um über demokratietheoretische Konzepte wie Politik, Demos, Partizipation, Solidarität, Freiheit, Gleichheit, Konflikt und Relationalität aus postkolonialer Sicht zu diskutieren. 


Der Workshop ist als Lektüre-Workshop konzipiert. Vorab werden ausgewählte Texte (ca. 200 Seiten) verschickt, die die Grundlage der gemeinsamen Diskussion darstellen.Bei Teilnehmer*innen wird die Bereitschaft vorausgesetzt, kurz in einen der Texte einzuführen.

Eine verbindliche Anmeldung zum Workshop ist erforderlich. Wir bitten alle Interessierten, sich bis 08.01.2020 bei gundula.ludwig@uni-bremen.de anzumelden. Die Teilnehmer*innenzahl ist beschränkt. Die Plätze werden nach dem first-come, first-serve-Prinzip vergeben.
Illustration für Call of Papers (Foto: Pixabay)Illustration für Call of Papers (Foto: Pixabay)
New Perspectives on Emancipatory & Radical Democratic Discourses

Die Ausschreibung zum Download (PDF)

This international symposium marks 2020 as the anniversary year of Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe’s seminal works, most prominently the 35th jubilee of “Hegemony and Socialist Strategy”. The publication sparked heated debate about the promises and potential
advantages of a post-Marxist project in an age of hegemonic neoliberal globalisation. It also laid the foundation for a fruitful anti-essentialist, post-structuralist theory of siscourse and hegemony, which strongly influenced strategies of the Left. While anniversaries are usually an occasion to celebrate, the political developments over the last few decades – the rise of right-wing groups and parties, growing inequalities, intensification of the global climate
crisis – hardly give reason to rejoice. In this vein, this jubilee provides an impulse for critical engagement both with the work of Laclau and Mouffe, as the so-called Essex School of Discourse Analysis, and with the broader field of post-structuralist discourse theory. The symposium is aimed at exploring possible future trajectories, moving beyond contextual adjustments and avoiding welltrodden paths.
All proposals examining theoretical  interventions and political implications of Laclau and Mouffe’s work are welcomed. We particularly encourage the submission of papers on the following questions: 

  • The relationship between radical democracy and populism: can the affirmative turn toward left populism be considered as a viable political strategy? Which conclusions can be drawn
  • from past left-wing populist projects? How can the relationship between radical democratic practice and left-wing populist strategy be systematised?
  • Re-evaluation of class as an analytical category for the discursive theory of hegemony: how can we – after Laclau and Mouffe’s intervention – revisit a critical engagement with class politics? How can we consider class in an anti-essentialist mode? How might the organisation of social struggles (including “identity politics”) around the category of class prevent their
  • incorporation into capitalist logic?
  • The plurality of emancipatory political practices: which different manifestations of emancipatory political practices can we articulate within and beyond the Essex School? How might we connect mainstream-oriented institutionalism with radical democratic theories and a discursive-hegemonic understanding
  • of politics and the political? Which challenges and pitfalls does post-structuralist institutionalism face and how can these
  • be overcome?

This international and interdisciplinary symposium challenges the distinction between political theory and practice. It is designed to
bring together scholars (graduate students as well as early-career and established researchers) and activists interested in the development of emancipatory political projects.

Submissions

We are accepting proposals for individual and joint papers (20 minutes). The deadline for submission is January 31st, 2020. Proposals
should consist of a single PDF file containing: presenter’s name, email address, institutional affiliation (if relevant); title of presentation and abstract (max. 300 words) including 3–5 keywords; brief biographical information of presenter (max. 100 words). We will confirm receipt of proposals. If accepted, participants
will be invited to submit papers for pre-circulation (max. 6000 words) by September 7th, 2020. There is no conference fee for participants.

Dates

January 31st, 2020: submission of abstracts
February 20th, 2020: notification of selection
September 7th, 2020: submission of papers
October 7th–9th, 2020: symposium

Speakers & Panelists

Paula Diehl, Kiel University
Lisa Disch, University of Michigan
Jason Glynos, University of Essex
Oliver Marchart, University of Vienna
Yannis Stavrakakis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Organising Committee

Michalina Golinczak, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder)
Martin Nonhoff, University of Bremen
Milos Rodatos, University of Greifswald

Contact

Proposals and queries should be directed to both
golinczak@europa-uni.de and milos.rodatos@uni-greifswald.de.

 

Plakat: Der Krieg gegen den PlanetenPlakat: Der Krieg gegen den Planeten
Der Krieg gegen den Planeten und die Perspektiven von Weltordnungspolitik an Kipppunkten der menschlichen Entwicklung

Am 27. November 2019 findet die 5. Dieter-Senghaas-Lecture im Olbers-Saal im Haus der Wissenschaft statt (19 Uhr). Prof. Dr. Birgit Mahnkopf spricht über den "Krieg gegen den Planeten". Die Veranstaltung findet mit Unterstützung der Landeszentrale für Politische Bildung Bremen statt. Zu der Veranstaltung sind alle Bürgerinnen und Bürger herzlich eingeladen.

Das Plakat können Sie hier herunterladen (im pdf oder im png-Format). 

Die Menschen sind, wenn auch in unterschiedlichem Ausmaß, je nach ihrer geographischen und sozialen Herkunft, zu einem „geologischen Faktor“ geworden, die das Klimagleichgewicht des Erdsystems aus der Balance bringen un das damit das “web of life“ zerstören, das sich im Verlauf von Milliarden von Jahren herausgebildet hat. Mit der Einbeziehung aller Regionen der Welt in das ökonomische und ökologische System des Kapitalismus scheint die Menschheit nun an der von den Klimaforschern identifizierten „planetarischen Schwelle“ angekommen. Jenseits dieser Schwelle muss mit irreversiblen massiven und plötzlichen Folgen für alle Lebewesen gerechnet werden: Ein Entwicklungspfad hin zu einem „hothouse“-Zustand, der über Zehn- bis Hunderttausende von Jahren Bestand haben könnte.

Ist es vorstellbar, dass unter den Bedingungen von kollabierenden Ökosystemen und von essenziellem Mangel an für uns unverzichtbaren „Schätzen der Natur“ eine progressive menschliche Entwicklung möglich ist? Wie wahrscheinlich ist es, dass eine Zivilisierung unvermeidlicher Konflikte und eine zeitgemäße Toleranz sich herausbilden werden? Kurzum, können wir uns angesichts dieser Entwicklungen eine „Weltordnung in der zerklüfteten Welt“ (Dieter Senghaas) vorstellen, die dem Frieden eine Zukunft gibt oder müssen wir die weltweiten Problemlagen nicht vielmehr als Elemente einer systemischen Krise des Kapitalismus verstehen, die innerhalb dieses System gar nicht gelöst werden können?

Birgit Mahnkopf ist Professorin für Europäische Gesellschaftspolitik an der Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin. Sie ist Mitglied im Wissenschaftlichen Beirat von attac Deutschland, im Kuratorium des Instituts Solidarische Moderne und im Beirat der Open-Access-Zeitschrift Momentum Quarterly. Zu ihren Arbeitsschwerpunkten gehören die ökonomische, politische und soziale Dimensionen der Globalisierung sowie europäische und internationale Politik. Außerdem beschäftigt sie sich mit Arbeitssoziologie und industriellen Beziehungen sowie mit Bildungsökonomie und Bildungspolitik.

Mit dieser Vortragsreihe würdigen das Institut für Interkulturelle und Internationale Studien (InIIS) und die Landeszentrale für Politische Bildung Bremen Leben und Werk des international bedeutenden Friedens- und Konfliktforschers, der seit 1978 an der Universität Bremen lehrt und itbegründer des InIIS ist. Mit dem von ihm entwickelten „zivilisatorischen Hexagon“, das auf die Möglichkeiten friedlicher Entwicklung in und zwischen Gesellschaften abhebt, hat er ein Paradigma geschaffen, das es bis in die Abituraufgaben deutscher Schülerinnen und Schüler und in die bedeutendsten Lehrwerke Internationaler Beziehungen geschafft hat. Sein Buch „Zivilisierung wider Willen“ über den langen und schwierigen Prozess einer nachhaltigen Friedensgestaltung in Europa ist in zahlreiche Sprachen, u.a. ins Chinesische, Arabische und Koreanische übersetzt worden. Sein Gesamtwerk umfasst u.a. 35 vom ihm verfasste Bücher sowie 35 weitere Bücher, an denen er als Herausgeber oder Ko-Autor beteiligt war.