Politics & Finance Seminar Series

Place:
UNICOM, INIIS
Room: 7.2210
Mary-Somerville-Str. 7
Bremen
Time:
10:00 - 13:00
Lecture Series :
Politics and Finance
Semester:
SoSe 2017

One day before, at July 5th, 16:15 hrs., Eve Chiapello helds a lecture, "The Financialization of Public Policies", at the BIGSSS-Lecture-Series.

Find more information.

The research group “Transnational Political Ordering in Global Finance”, led by Prof. Sebastian Botzem, has launched its seminar series “Politics & Finance”. The series provides a platform to discuss current issues and ongoing research projects at the intersection of politics and finance. It features both renowned and emerging scholars, as well as practitioners from finance, financial regulation, civil society, and other related fields.

Place:
UNICOM, InIIS
Room: 7.2020
Mary-Somerville-Str. 7
Bremen
Time:
10:00 - 12:00
Lecture Series :
Politics and Finance
Semester:
SoSe 2017

Moderation: Sebastian Botzem
The program as pdf.

We will read and discuss selected contributions from a special issue of NPE.

All participants are kindly asked to read and prepare all texts. In the first hour, each text will be shortly introduced by the respective text mentor and then discussed by the group. In the second hour of the session, we will jointly discuss some guiding questions on the usefulness of process tracing in IPE and potentially other fields of academic inquiry.
If you wish to participate, please send an email to smoeller@uni-bremen.de.

Literature

  • Trampusch, C. & Palier, B. (2016): Between X and Y: how process tracing contributes to opening the black box of causality. In: New Political Economy 21:5, 437-454. Text mentor: Sebastian Möller
  • Falleti, T.G. (2016): Process tracing of extensive and intensive processes. In: New Political Economy 21:5, 455-462. Text mentor: Alexander Meland
  • Mahony, J. (2016): Mechanisms, Bayesianism, and process tracing. In: New Political Economy 21:5, 493-499. Text mentor: Marcus Wolf
  • Mayntz, R. (2016): Process tracing, abstraction, and varieties of cognitive interest. In: New Political Economy 21:5, 484-488. Text mentor: Nikolai Kotucha
  • Hay, C. (2016): Process tracing: a laudable aim or a high-tariff methodology? In: New Political Economy 21:5, 500-504. Text mentor: Nikolai Kotucha
Politics&Finance SeminarSeries

Investment clubs as homosocial groups. Which is the value of this category of analysis?

Lydia Welbers (BIGSSS)17.01.2017
Place:

Room: 7.2020
Mary-Somerville-Str. 7
Bremen
Time:
12:15 - 13:45
Lecture Series :
Politics and Finance
Semester:
WiSe 2016/17

Investment clubs (as associations of small investors, which pool their money) have to decide together, how to invest their money on the financial market. On the group level, members of the group look quite similar. Therefore these groups can be divided in male and female associations. The talk focusses on the added value by describing investment clubs as homosocial groups by mentioning differences and similarities between these groups and their decision making processes.

After the presentation, there will be plenty of time to ask questions and discuss various aspects of the topic. If you wish to attend the seminar, please write an email to smoeller[at]uni-bremen.de.

Lydia Welbers, doctoral researcher at the Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy (SOCIUM) at the University of Bremen, presents tentative findings and thought on her ongoing doctoral thesis in a project on decision-making practices of small investors.

Learn more at the website of the research group Transnational Political Ordering in Global Finance.

Place:

Room: 7.2210
Mary-Somerville-Str. 7
Bremen
Time:
12:45 - 13:45
Lecture Series :
Politics and Finance
Semester:
WiSe 2016/17

Prof. Lucia Quaglia (University of York) will be guest in our “Politics & Finance Seminar Series” at InIIS. She will talk about the political economy of domestic compliance with international financial standards in the case of Basel Accords in banking regulation. Lucia is one the most renowed experts on European financial governance and works in the fields of International & Comparative Political Economy. During her current fellowship at Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg she explores transatlantic economic coordination together with Prof. Susanne K. Schmidt from InIIS.

Abstract of the talk: Why do jurisdictions comply (or not) with international financial standards? This research examines the mixed record of compliance of the two main jurisdictions worldwide – the United States and the European Union – with the most well-known financial standards, the Basel Accords. It draws attention to the ‘misfit’ between the international standard-setting process and the process of domestic compliance. In the uploading stage, elected officials delegate international standard-setting to domestic regulators and large internationally-active financial institutions successfully mobilise. In the downloading stage, domestic interest groups team up with elected officials in order to resist compliance with international standards that have negative distributional implications for domestic constituencies.