Events

Place:
InIIS, UNICOM
Room: 7.2210

Bremen
Time:
16:00 - 00:00
Lecture Series :
BIGSSS-InIIS-Colloquium
Semester:
WiSe 2017/18

The InIIS-BIGSSS-Colloquium brings together researchers from InIIS, doctoral and post-doctoral fellows from BIGSSS field A, and other people interested in its topics. It offers an opportunity to present and discuss current research in the areas of International Relations, Political Theory, and European Studies.

Please contact herold@uni-bremen.de a week prior for access to the reading.

Coordinators: Klaus Schlichte (klaus.schlichte@uni-bremen.de);
Martin Nonhoff (martin.nonhoff@uni-bremen.de),

Place:
University of Bremen Guest House
Auf dem Teerhof 58
28199 Bremen
Time:
00:00 - 00:00
Semester:
SoSe 2017

Download the program as pdf.

In recent decades, political and academic discussions of conflict-related sexualised and gender based violence (CRSV) have made important advances. CRSV has been recognised on the international stage as an important social and security problem. International organisations and NGOs commit large resources to reduce CRSV and to alleviate its effects. Their projects seek to change social conceptions of gender and violence in local contexts in ways that previously have not been envisaged by humanitarian and military interventions. At the same time, a lively academic discussion has highlighted the complex reasons behind CRSV. Moreover, practices of intervention have been critically scrutinized in important ways.

Despite increasing attention to the subject, scholars and practitioners are still far from finding common grounds when it comes to defining causes and consequences of CRSV or the appropriate ways of tackling the problem. Research has sometimes produced contradictory results and continues to struggle with the problem of data collection in this sensible field. Without empirically-based knowledge of the problem, interventions run the risk of generating undesired effects. Also the international focus on CRSV may have led to unintended consequences of intervention.

The aim of the workshop is to bring together scholars from different fields working on questions related to causes and consequences of CRSV, intervention practices, and evolving (gendered) power relations between intervention organizations, host states and societies.

The workshop is funded by the DFG.

Place:

Room: 7.2210

Bremen
Time:
16:00 - 18:00
Lecture Series :
Historical International Political Sociology - Colloquium
Semester:
WiSe 2016/17

Based on ethnographic research in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, this paper traces some of the adverse effects of international interventions on sexual violence on beneficiaries and local actors. It starts by outlining how international humanitarian frames establish Congo’s sexual violence as ‘exceptional’ and different. The humanitarian formation then gives rise to new sites of exclusion, such as the failure to recognise other forms of (non-sexual) violence. Drawing on narratives of Congolese women and men, the paper identifies two particular effects of such framings, notably discursive colonisation and dehistoricisation.
Firstly, individual approaches to sexual violence as a woman’s issue and unrelated to other forms of violence discursively colonise the response to and the intelligibility of sexual violence. In authorising and designing interventions based on global rather than local discourses, international actors close off international discursive space to local voices and alternative analyses. Secondly, I describe the dehistoricising effects of humanitarian narratives of victims’ experiences of violence. In singling out female rape victims, humanitarian interventions create a ‘universal humanitarian subject’, a homogenous mass of gendered victims, stripped of historical or political agency and memory.
The paper draws methodological attention back to violence as it is lived, experienced, and articulated by all those affected by violence. Such narratives then reveal how sexual violence occurs as part of intersecting and multiple forms of other violence embedded within the region’s socio-cultural, political and economic context. This paper thus argues for deeper engagement with the people who experience and observe such violent continuities, and for providing the discursive spaces in which articulations of all experiences of violence can emerge.

Place:

Room: 7.2210
Mary-Soerville-Str 7
Bremen
Time:
14:00 - 18:00
Lecture Series :
Historical International Political Sociology - Colloquium
Semester:
WiSe 2016/17

Reading
Braudel, Fernand (2011): History and the Social Sciences: The Longue Duree (1980), in: Cultural Theory. An Anthology, ed. by Imre Szeman and Timothy Kaposy. Chicherster: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 365-375.

Presentation
Nina Engwicht (Friedensakademie Rheinland-Pfalz, Uni Koblenz-Landau):
Illegal Markets in Post-Conflict Societies

Contact: Alex Veit, veit@uni-bremen.de

Mailing list: https://mailman.zfn.uni-bremen.de/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/hips-kolloquium

Flyer zum Download

Place:

Room: Mary-Somerville-Str.
7
Bremen
Time:
14:00 - 18:00
Lecture Series :
Historical International Political Sociology - Colloquium
Semester:
WiSe 2016/17

Contact: Alex Veit, veit@uni-bremen.de

Mailing list: https://mailman.zfn.uni-bremen.de/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/hips-kolloquium

Flyer zum Download

Place:

Room: 7.2210
Mary-Somerville-Str. 7
Bremen
Time:
14:00 - 18:00
Lecture Series :
Historical International Political Sociology - Colloquium
Semester:
WiSe 2016/17

Contact: Alex Veit, veit@uni-bremen.de


Mailing list: https://mailman.zfn.uni-bremen.de/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/hips-kolloquium

Der Colloquiums-Flyer zum Herunterladen

Place:
University of Bremen Guest House
Auf dem Teerhof 58 58
28199 Bremen
Time:
14:00 - 19:00

Organizers: Prof. Klaus Schlichte, Dr. Roy Karadag, Dr. Alex Veit

Social policy in Africa, apart from a few countries, is an understudied field. Existing studies, just as in research on social policy on other continents, strongly emphasize the domestic side of policy development. The workshop instead seeks to integrate both domestic and transnational factors that may explain the rise, demise and renaissance of social politics and welfare states in Africa. Pre-colonial systems of redistribution, the activities of missionary societies and brotherhoods, the role of international organizations, transnational mobilization, and bilateral cooperation are just a few aspects. This exploratory workshop aims “to screen the landscape”, exchange ideas on past and future research, explore previously overlooked questions, identify cross-cutting issues, and understand both similarities and differences across contexts.

The Program as pdf.

Seminar (summer term 2012)

States, Societies and the International in Africa

Antonia Witt, Dr. Alex Veit16.04.2012 - 21.07.2012
Place:
SFG
Room: 1030

Bremen
Time:
08:00 - 10:00
Semester:
SoSe 2012

This seminar deals with some of the most fundamental readings in African politics. The general aim is to introduce students to some of the main approaches and debates in the conceptualisation of politics in Africa, state-society relations, as well as the impact of Africa’s inclusion in global political and economic processes. It particularly seeks to transcend the distinction between comparative politics and international relations by highlighting the multiple ways in which African states and societies have been mutually influenced by their often ambiguous relationship with the outside world. The course starts from conceptions of the post-colonial African state, its colonial inheritances, continuities and changes since decolonisation and the end of the Cold War, as well as the resulting consequences for the relationship between states and societies. Controversial conceptions such as weak and quasi-states, neopatrimonial rule, civil society, ethnicity, dependency and extraversion, as well as state failure and state formation are discussed.

The course particularly focuses on East Africa and West Africa. Theoretical and conceptual readings will be balanced with case studies from these regions. Students are encouraged to give presentations on case studies or on the academic reception of theoretical approaches.